nervous horse

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kimberly
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nervous horse

Postby kimberly » Sat Oct 07, 2006 12:15 am

I have a 4yr old, well be 5. I started him as a 2yr old went good, then was sent to the race track and some problems. I have rode him off and on tell now. But he still needs to be lunged before getting on, he's totally terrifed of everything! He can't stand still feels like he might buck!, when he gets scared he freezes up. This boy is huge 16hh and powerfull. Any suggestions on what I should do with him to get him over this probelm or someone willing to try. I thought if i gave him time to grow up he might mature but looking not!
He's been to the dentist, chiropracter nothing seems to help him. Werid thing is he's really good indoors!
Could he have a sight problems?

Thanks
Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyways - John Wayne

I will not ask anything of my horse unless I'm pretty sure I can get it.. - John Lyons

AimesB
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remedy for nervous horse

Postby AimesB » Sat Oct 07, 2006 8:38 am

Kim,
I had a horse that I had no knowledge of his prior history, and he would all of a sudden freak out a t little things that he shouldn't have. Someone told me about "star of Bethlehem", it is supposed to help animals (and humans) get over shock or a tramatic incident that happened recently or many years ago. Maybe something happened to him at the track that he can't get over. Anyway, here is a link to a website about it. You just need to put some drops in his mouth prior to an event. I sold my horse before i got around to trying it, but it's worth a shot for you to try. hope this helps

http://www.herbalremedies.com/starofbet10v1.html

Gallamist
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Postby Gallamist » Sat Oct 07, 2006 5:23 pm

I personally would just spend more one on one time with him on the ground...getting him used to the things that you know spook him and let him know it's OK and nothing is going to hurt him.
If your not making dust your eating it.

A horse remembers what happened before what happened, happened.

kimberly
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Postby kimberly » Sat Oct 07, 2006 10:20 pm

We have spent a lot of time with him, he was like that when he was 2 so I think it's a lot just him! I have spent a lot of work on him as a 2yr old and he did awsome, he bucked a lot on the track hates men now, now he's pretty nervous and terrifed of his own shadow which he always has been. Have you found you could work it out of him like a few hard months of work, or should you waste your time. He's bred nice awsome looking horse, just a huge chicken. In the round pen and arena the best horse you could ever ride! anything different really gets him.
I just don't want to put a lot of time on him if it don't leave has anyone had good luck on getting a horse through this like him. Casue he is so big he can get my number too!
Does anyone where someone willing to work with to see if it well come out of him?

thanks everyone for responding.
Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyways - John Wayne



I will not ask anything of my horse unless I'm pretty sure I can get it.. - John Lyons

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cisco
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Postby cisco » Sun Oct 08, 2006 8:38 am

We've had some pretty scaredycat colts here. The best thing I've found was to just take our time and get them out and around lots of stuff. In my opinion, if they can deal with all things in nature, they'll have no troubles with an arena. The other way around doesn't work so good. I like to expose them to as much out there as I can. We're blessed to live in a river valley where we have a river, tons of treed leaseland, trails, open fields, you name it. It's awsome for quieting down colts. With a colt like that, I would try to expose them with very little pressure to begin with, so that he can get over some of his fears without dealing with a rider getting impatient or scared. One way to do this is to pony him lots through different areas (with a good, quiet saddlehorse). I also recommend spending some everyday handling that he will enjoy. We will usually bring a colt like this into the barn every day and let them stand in a tie stall (lots of food in front of them so that it is enjoyable) so that they can be there while other horses are being brought in and out, we're cleaning the barn, bringing in feed - lots of stuff going on. Then I'll also bring the colt along when taking some other horses to different arenas - for more experience. When it all adds up, it's amazing how much more confident and secure these colts get. Lots of good experiences with their handlers and some enjoyable time spent out in the environment they thought was so darn scary. It might not always work, but worth a try when you really like a horse.
until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened

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barrelgal73
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Calmer

Postby barrelgal73 » Sun Oct 08, 2006 9:08 am

I found the best thing to calm a horse down is take them to the mountains as a pack horse. I never thought it would do the trick but it worked for my mare who had a fear of people and everything. She got too rough of training when she was broke and bucked alot. My boyfriend did alot of roundpen work to get her to trust him first.

RockStar
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nervous horse

Postby RockStar » Sun Oct 08, 2006 9:49 am

I had a gelding that sounds similar to this one - but maybe worse. He too was on the track, and hated men, and was scared of his own shadow. You couldn't even put a blanket on him normally, you had to "put" it on him, not throw it over him, every time, for 5 years, he never got over it, same with being saddled, you had to be so careful. He never bucked (thank godness - he was 16.2) I tried everything with him, I was always kind and patient, and spent sooo much time with him, round penned, repeated exposure to things that really bothered him - like grand entry flags - and he actually seemed to get worse. I ended up selling him as a "non quiet" trail horse.

I don't want to discourage you, but I wasted 5 years on him (he was patterned when I got him) and because of his issues, I actually lost a whole bunch of confidence in the arena.

Just sharing my thoughts, maybe your guy can be worked through his issues - maybe send him to someone experieced that rides colts on a community pasture or big ranch? sometimes miles do help.
"Being happy doesn't mean everything is perfect, It means you've decided to see beyond the imperfections."

Kopes18
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nervous horse

Postby Kopes18 » Sun Oct 08, 2006 11:20 am

Hey Kimberley - I too have experienced some of what you are going through. My horse was great when it was just him and I in the arena but get him out on the trail or around horses he didn't know and boy was it a show. I asked around to a lot of people, and a trainer friend of mine suggeseted doing some Parelli work with him. Getting him to trust me and building up his confidence. It took awhile - months actually - as the man that had him before me beat the living heck out of this horse and the horse had no confidence or trust for anything. I worked on him with the friendly games for about a month and then moved forwards after that. It took time, patience, and soft kind words to build this boy up again.
Where do you live? I have several friends - both jockies and trainers - that have seen amazing results with horses that no one thought could be tamed or worked with. Just a thought. One other thing that I have seen a few of the girls I barrel race with use is a magnetic band that you put on their headstall. It is a super calming agent for the hrose and I can't believe the difference it has made, horses that wouldn't go in the gate before now walk right in, horses that would always be freaked by everything near them, now walking so smoothly and confidently down the trail. I know that at some poiint you have to decide if it is worth it for you - but it sounds to me like you really want things to work with this horse and that you aren't ready to give up. Good luck with your horse. :lol:
My journey is not to arrive at my grave site rested and in a well preserved body......but rather to skid in, jump off my horse and shout........Holy S*!T .....what a ride!!

bccanchaser
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Postby bccanchaser » Mon Oct 09, 2006 1:54 pm

I have a 5 year Doc Bar/Dash for Cash gelding that I bought a year ago. He is the biggest chicken I've ever met!! And he too is big. His training consisted of 90 days of galloping at the track. I have no idea what possessed me to buy him, but I really regretted it afterwards. Anytime something landed around his feet he'd try and stomp it. He'd strike out at whatever it was that was coming at him or buck if it landed on his rump. Quite frankly, I didn't even want to think about getting on him. So basically he sat in my field for this past year. However, everyday I would make a point of petting him and patting him(which he hated). I did this of course after I cornered him to catch him. :-D I only have 3 other horses and they are in your pocket kind of horses. So he was definitely an outcast. This past spring I decided I would sell him because I really didn't have the time or experience to deal with this type of horse. But for some reason I never advertised him and this past summer he is a completely different horse. He meets me at the gate knickering for his feed instead of running away and waiting for me to leave. He also meets me at the gate now "just because" I really go out of my way to hug him and move "suddenly" around him. Basically I do everything he doesn't like. I'm kind and fair but I do the things that scare him the most. Like "throwing" my saddle and saddle pad on him, etc. I treat him like he is broke but I am prepared for him to react like he isn't. And WOW I can't believe the kind of horse he is this fall. I haven't rode him yet but I've been ponying him out and he is the most level headed horse, he doesn't even spook at the grouse that jump out of the bushes beside him. I am so amazed at how far along he has come. This spring I am hopefully sending him to Doug Mills for his basic training and then I will be putting a pattern on him. For the first time since I bought him a little over a year ago, I am really excited about running barrels on him. I suspect he will always be a little quirky, but so long as he's safe and likes to run barrels, I suppose he will have a home here. :lol:

kimberly
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Postby kimberly » Mon Oct 09, 2006 3:00 pm

My guy is in your pocket type of horse, he is to the point out in the pasture he's a pain in the butt! He loves people he's catty with new people, but casue I started him he follows me around like a lost puppy dog! But no matter how much time I spent with him, if i sneeze to this day he jsut about jumps out of his skin! Like whats up with that! The thing that gets me is when your leading or, riding him he's terrifed of everything and anything, and when you watch him in the pasture he's about the same. A huge chicken!! I don;t mind when he is scared, but he freezes don't even breath I'm sure! If you get him to move before he wants to he wants to buck! But if you get off comfort him, then he moves again, but 9-10times he's still scared of what ever scared him before! If I ride him enough he does some what come out of it, but don't change things up casue your back to square one!
I just have never in my life seen a horse that has, well he has no confidence at all! He's been sacked out he's not scared of the saddle, blankets, e.c.t that don't seem to bother you can jump around like a silly rabbit and that don't bother him, it's jsut the rest of the world.
I'm jsut worried that maybe I can get him to where he is okay, but I'm a little unease if it well be okay once we leave the comforts of home, and go to like a rodeo and that. Seems if he stress him right a way fight's back, bucking, or runs, and he never had a bad experince like that. His experince on the track was to buck every jokey off that you put on him!
His last owner tried to drive him, on the wagon, he never did get use it and if anything he came back more terrifed! He is one puzzling horse!
Has anyone had goo dluck with a trainer, or with some kind of feed?
I hate to let him go but, if he needs a ton of one on one, i just can't give it with being a mom, and having 15 other horses too!
I'm also worried if i get him to where he's going pretty good is he a safe horse to sell?
I jsut heard that his breeding can sometime be a handfull so now I'm even more worried about this bugger we paid good money for him, and we don't want to through it way, but chez well he ever come down to where not everything is going to eat me!
Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyways - John Wayne



I will not ask anything of my horse unless I'm pretty sure I can get it.. - John Lyons

mowgli1
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nervous horse

Postby mowgli1 » Mon Oct 09, 2006 4:01 pm

Donna Weatherly makes some herbal remedy called Cool Focus, or a more chemcially ballanced suppliment is Easy Boy by Dynamite, might be worth a shot.

Merikle Waters
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Postby Merikle Waters » Tue Oct 10, 2006 11:15 pm

kimberly wrote:I'm also worried if i get him to where he's going pretty good is he a safe horse to sell?
I jsut heard that his breeding can sometime be a handfull so now I'm even more worried about this bugger we paid good money for him, and we don't want to through it way, but chez well he ever come down to where not everything is going to eat me!


Where are you located?? I might be able to help you out if you are fairly close by.

Biggest thing is trust with horses. And it sounds like your horses trust has been broken, maybe at the track or something like that.

Big big big thing that can help. Take him for walks (leading), show him new things, and soothe him. Gain his trust from the ground, don't just get up there, and let him be worried.

Work with trust first in the round pen. Show him new things gradually, soothing him, and praising him for being calm. When ever you get on him, turn his head on the right side towards you, and stroke his eye, repeat on the left side. If he won't stand still to mount, or moves the minute your butt hits the saddle, tie him up to mount. Wait until he is standing perfectly still, and get off and untie him. Re-mount, and if he won't stand still, tie him and repeat until he will stand still.

Trust, trust trust. If he is nervous, or uncomfortable, he rely's on you to be his safety. If he doesn't trust you, he will almost ignore you when scared as if "you won't help him anyways".

Calm him constantly on your walks (in hand) around the neighbourhood. Pet him, talk soothingly, and if nervous, stroke his eye and remind him you will keep him safe. As you go along, have him fully tacked for your walks.

If you are interested in some help, feel free to PM me.
Saving The Life Of One Horse May Not Change The World......But It will Surely Change The World For That One Horse..

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cisco
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Postby cisco » Wed Oct 11, 2006 6:58 am

Good ideas, but I would highly recommend NOT tying a horse up to mount them - especially when they are scared as it is. If that horse was to spook while you're sitting up there and start pulling back ...... well, I'm sure you've seen a horse flail around when pulling back ..... and then, if the rope or halter breaks - :shock: bad, bad, bad! If approaching it this way, I would recommend having someone hold the horse, or better yet, don't swing over until the horse is standing totally still and is comfortable. Theres no sense being on his back until he is ready and relaxed.
until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened

kimberly
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Postby kimberly » Wed Oct 11, 2006 11:27 am

This guy is an angle when it comes to being in the round pen, like riding an old broke horse, that is were he is most comforatble. He trusts me casue he well go with me. It just his lack of confidence, even out in the pasture in the heard being horse he's not confident. Even the arena I can't complain he's pretty good. But go down the road, yicks the poor guy is terrifed! Even in the yard he's terrifed, can't stand still things scare him, I comfort him, try to get him over it by just leaving really, he's not one to face his fears, once he calms down we try it again. He only likes me nobody else has even been on his back, and if someone has they were also on the ground! Not comfy for me! He poines awsome goes any where with another horse, he's pretty good when riding with another horse, he's okay. Guess what it's going to take is a lot of WORK of riding with another horse for ahwile, start riding him alone, what you suggested taking him every where with me. And maybe it might come out of him to a point anyways! He has such soft eyes. He's my husband horses, but when my husband is around he's like a wild pony! I'm wondering if you would ever jsut let someone else on his back without all the work and e.c.t I have to give him to be there when he's ready to leave my hands! Thanks for all the advise and help with him. I'm located in Mayerthorpe, AB.
I even thought if i could someone to ride him out of all his sill things rope off him ride him for 5-6 hrs if that would help to maybe mature. I feel he's not has much scared has jsut no confiendce like he's stuck being a 2yr old!
Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyways - John Wayne



I will not ask anything of my horse unless I'm pretty sure I can get it.. - John Lyons

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cisco
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Postby cisco » Wed Oct 11, 2006 11:51 am

If he's only scared when he's without another horse, maybe ground driving him would help. If he knows his cues really well, it should be easy, just start in the round pen to make sure everything is working fine, then I would head out down the road, in the field, down the trail - wherever you think he needs to gain confidence. It's great exercise and you'll be able to expose him to these environments while giving him proper guidance as you won't have you're safety interfering with you're reactions. This will also give you more confidence in seeing how he reacts when he faces his fears - you'll be more ready for his reactions once you do decide to ride. In my mind, driving them is the closest thing to riding them without risking you're safety. Just be sure to cue him the same way you will when riding him and you could even have someone else do it for awhile so that he gets used to other people working with him.
until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened


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