Stoping horses at end of run.

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ronni
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Stoping horses at end of run.

Postby ronni » Mon Jul 18, 2005 12:15 pm

Not a big surprise that I would be curious about this one now. :oops:

So, from what I have had folks tell me, my horse either got a bridal malfunction, I didn't sit fast enough, or he just plain was being scared and ran through the stop. (this is what I figure, because this sucker is broke, but he can be bad at times. )

This was the first time that I have ever called on him this way. What do you all suggest I should do from here on in with him, to prevent it.

It never occorued to me to turn him at the end, and like I said, I really don't know if I sat or pulled him up at the right time.

If anyone has any suggestions, or tell me what went wrong please do. Trust me I won't be offended, PM me if you don't want to put it up. I would rather learn from this mistake and never have that experience again!
Opportunities always look bigger going than coming.

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Double D
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Postby Double D » Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:08 pm

What happened?
"When your horse follows you without being asked, when he rubs his head on yours, and when you look at him and feel a tingle down your spine...you know you are loved." ~ John Lyons

CD
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Postby CD » Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:16 pm

First, I hope your doing ok.

I watched from the stands, from what I saw he was runnng hard home and didn't see the gate until the last second, he attempted to turn as he hit the gate but it was way too late, he hit it sideways and it flew open, he continued to spin around and fell on his side in the process and that's why you ended up both on the ground facing into the arean.

It was a bad set up, horses are used to running out and the gate was very difficult to see, the ground was a little slick underneathe, and there was a VERY short stoppng distance.

A big lesson is to ALWAYS latch the gate, it is not uncommon for horse to bump up against the gate or slide into it ( not that I encourage it). Also as a rider we all need to evaluate the arena's and ride accordingly, I am very glad to hear you are ok, it could have been a lot worse.

tdw
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Postby tdw » Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:36 pm

By the sounds of it - it sounds like a fluke accident that he didn't see the gate.

But if you do continue to have the problem this is what I do. My horse isn't the best stopper at the end of a run --- and I don't get after him for it much because he is a "race horse" - and I don't want to make a mountain out of a mole hill. I use to be very concerned about running into things at the end of the run with a closed gate but my friend told me to just sit deep and say whoa and don't [/u[u]]pull on them. Sounds simple but it works for me. He still bumps into it from time to time but at least it isn't a tug of war. (of course this obviously won't work if your horse can not see the gate :shock: )
:D

Tofarnorth
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Postby Tofarnorth » Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:54 pm

It looked to me like he tried really hard to stop. You coulda had a 40' slide the way he was running home - had you been prepared! :D
I think that was just one of those 'things'. Kinda like the eye not working for Randa's beautiful run.
I used to turn my horses instead of running strait to the fence and was told more accidents happen that way, then going strait to the fence.
Good luck in Medicine Hat! You'll be back on by then!
Happy I was able to help.
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Postby Drinking Pepsi » Tue Aug 16, 2005 11:52 pm

Ronni............ I watched the run on tape... I honestly think that there was something with your bridle You pulled and he had a sever reaction..... Like it was to much bridle for him.... He is very broke and from what i have seen of him and know of him I don't think that he needs that big ugly setup

ronni
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stopping

Postby ronni » Wed Aug 17, 2005 10:52 am

Hmmmm, I see you just joined today.

Apparently you know me quiet well, even though I have no idea as to who you may be. May I give you a friendly tip to look at the wording of the other responses on topics, and how they are written to be constructive not offensive.

If you know my Steamer horse you also know the long story of his neck. I have tried all other types of bridles and have found that he is one happy horse on the barrels with this one.

Don't know how long you have been barrel racing but if you have been doing it a while, you know how things can go great in slow work and fall apart when speed is added.

The wreck was a combination of me riding like I was riding my mare, my previous two times only and him having a flash back to a particular trainer when he was in reining training. Happens every once in a while that he just runs right through a stop, ...maybe just a stride or two but that is all it took with the combination of the other things.

So thanks for the suggestion to check the bridle, but a friend brought the fitting up right after the wreck happend and I checked it and had others check it also... but that wasn't it.

Like I say, if you really know him you may have seen that particular attractive move of running through a stop before.... just to bad I didn't sit up earlier and just had to ride through the timer line.... I think if I had used my head and remembered what horse I was riding he would have had more of chance all together.
Opportunities always look bigger going than coming.

cshendruk
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stopping

Postby cshendruk » Wed Aug 17, 2005 12:25 pm

I read your post and thought I would just add my two cents in...lol.

I was not there to witness your acciddent so therefore I am not totally sure what happened but this is what I believe.

I have ridden my share of different barrel horses in the past as well, and when running home I have found that the best thing to do is run your horse straight at the fence or down the alley. When you are nearing the end of your running and past the timer line getting closer to the fence, my personal opinion is to sit deep in you saddle place one hand on the horn with your other on the rein and let the horse collect up, sit down and stop on its own. You do have to make sure that you sit a little while in advance though so that your horse has the oppurtunity to prepare for the stop. I have found that this works with many of my different horses, they all run in different bridles, and some are more hot/fast than the others.

I do not believe in letting your horses turn at the end of your run, only under a very certain circumstance. I feel that if you always let your horses turn at the end of your run, you horse could create a bad habit and start interpreting the turn too early. I have seen horses do this many times before they are even past the timer line because they have gotten away with it too long. I also feel that it is way more dangerous than just stopping straight.

I totally know how you feel with your wreck as I had been in a similar position 2yrs ago. I was at a barrel race at a really nice indoor arena. The indoor wasn't a huge arena, but a pretty good size pattern had been set up to make the most out of the arena size however there wasn't a whole lot of stopping room. A 5-6 foot plywood type wall had been set up to be used as a stopping fence. I sat on my horse while the barrel racing was going on and watched as many people turned their horses at the end of their run and I vowed that I wouldn't do it. When I made my run I was coming home from the third barrel and passed the timer line, I think I may have sat down just a little too late not giving my horse enough time to stop, but still to this day don't know exactly what happened. My horse slide aways and then with no where to go at the last minute tried to bail the fence with no success. I was thrown over the wall and when I looked up the horse had its frontal body over the fence as if it was going to land on top of me, luckily for my sake it fell backwards over the other side of the fence opposite to me. Anyways despite this, I ended up pulling in the third fastest time in the open and winning the youth division. A nice buckle, and some prizes as well as some good money so it was worth it. :D My horse was sore for a couple weeks after that...but she ended up being just fine.

I had never had this problem before and sometimes I think fluke things like this just happen. I also rode a horse before that had a big engine and on the way home, the more you got on his face the harder he would run. By letting him stop himself it taught him to really back off and now he is great. I think just stay with how you normally ride him, chances are he will remember the wreck too and really be more aware of things at the end of his run.

ronni
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stopping

Postby ronni » Wed Aug 17, 2005 2:18 pm

I agree about the stopping straight at the end. It has been ingrained in me, I just wish I could think faster during my runs. I admire girls that can fix stuff as it happens, I just kind of let it happen and then go Oh! I should have...
Maybe though this time I should have turned? at least had a plan for a short end stop? I never really gave the timer to end gate thing a thought until it was wayyyyy to late! :oops:
Thanks for your experience though and sharing it. My horse ended up with a huge bubble on his butt, which thankfully is just about gone by now, and we will see what he will do the next time round. :)
Opportunities always look bigger going than coming.

randa
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Postby randa » Wed Aug 17, 2005 4:01 pm

I have to say that I always try to stop straight but a Millarville I decided to turn my horse off and stop in the corner. I was a little nervous with that short of a stop and just thought it would be safer.

I will have to tell you about the time I hit the gate and just about killed the guy standing behind it!! :evil:
You can only have one thought at a time, will it be positive or negative?

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Double D
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Postby Double D » Wed Aug 17, 2005 4:08 pm

I don't know if one way is better than the other, in three seperate incidents = I broke the gate guys leg (he didn't have the gate chained shut), my horse jumped the outgate (luckily the guy didn't have it chained) and my mare slid right into a paige wire fence a the end of my run at the end of the arena at a jackpot. I was always under the impression that stoping straight was better but I dunno?

Edited to add:

Hmmm...Think I should work on my stopping skills?
"When your horse follows you without being asked, when he rubs his head on yours, and when you look at him and feel a tingle down your spine...you know you are loved." ~ John Lyons

ronni
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stopping

Postby ronni » Wed Aug 17, 2005 5:12 pm

See, that is what I mean about girls thinking. Randa looked and made an intelegent decision where I just went and ran. ... no back up plan for me!
All this makes me feel like I am not the only one this has happend to! Thanks girls! :D
Oh yeah, and what did you do to the gate guy Randa?
Opportunities always look bigger going than coming.

randa
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Postby randa » Wed Aug 17, 2005 5:25 pm

I was running at Faulkland, BC (sp). Earlier that day when the water truck went into the arena he was parked in front of the gate and it left a large puddle. Well when it was my turn to run it was pretty wild and my horse was really running hard. It is a standard pattern and back then a closed gate. So I am running home and not too worried because this particular horse just stops straight every time and is easy to stop. WELL he starts into his stop, hits the wet spot and his back end started to slide up under his front end (like a really nice sliding stop gone bad) :cry: . So he decided instead of wiping out he would launch himself forward. The gate was locked and the gate man was standing directly behind it. My horse hit the gate dead on with his chest. He was also about 4 feet off the ground at the time, I think he thought his only option was to try to jump the fence...the gate came open and hit the man full on. He was knocked about 5 feet backward and was out cold :shock: . I am not sure if I remember this right but I am sure he died!! And the paramedics revived him. NOT REALLY but I thought he was dead. I was so scared.

My brother was videoing it and got it all on tape! A few weeks later we were in Kelowna and he came over to talk to me ( he is friends with my mom and family). He told me it was his own fault for standing behind the gate and he hoped I was okay!! I saw him a few years ago at the rodeo and he had not forgotten me. :lol:
You can only have one thought at a time, will it be positive or negative?

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Postby Sam » Wed Aug 17, 2005 5:39 pm

Just 2 weeks ago we had this debate because a girl at our local jackpot had a huge reck when she turned her horse at the end of the arena. The sand was deeper at the end and he lost his footing really bad. Needless to say, she is now stopping her horse at the gate. I think we as barrel racers need to get off our horses and walk some patterns like jumpers do. Look down from 3rd and see what the best option for your horse is. If it's hard for us to see the gate, why would they. Another benefit to stopping sqaure is your horse really learns to stop with their ass under them. I also have to agree with teaching yourself to sit down to stop. That would really help if you were to have a bridle malfunction at some time. :)


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