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Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:32 pm

weder wrote:Thank you very much for taking the time to answer our questions Molly!!!

My horse is very powerful in his turns and tends to pop me out of the saddle. I am trying really hard to sit deep and lock my elbow, but he still seems to pop me out. Any suggestions or ideas that could help me ride smoother through his turns?

Thank you once again 8o)


Hello! I apologize that I am on a little late tonight - I just returned from the weekly jackpot down at the Lonestar Arena in Stephenville, TX (my hometown). In response to your question about your horse that pops you in the saddle, I have one main thought on this. Without seeing your horse, it's hard to say exactly what is going on, of course. The first thing that comes to my mind is front end soundness. Have you taken x-rays of his feet lately? It sounds kind of backwards, but a horse is an 'into pressure' animal, so if his front feet are hurting, he may want to get onto them more. Of course, I could be completely wrong, and its his hind end...... If only they could talk:) I would place him on some Pureform Glucosamine product right away, to cover my bases.

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:38 pm

puma23 wrote:Yes, thank you Molly for answering our questions :)

I have been riding a 10 year old mare that runs a very honest, consistant pattern, however I find that she doesn't hussle in her turns and this is where I am loosing time. What type of drills would you recommend I could do? Who do you look up to in barrel racing, who is yoru mentor?


This is such a good question, and one of my specialties 8o) There are a couple of bases that you will need to cover here, and it would be great for you to see my new video because of the racehorse influence (speed:) Your horse needs to feel like running - and this desire to 'fire' will help make your horse more aggressive in her turns. I would try Pureform's Performance One on her if you think that is a factor for your horse. Always trust your own opinion as you know the situation first hand. The second thing that I would work on, and this is carry off the tip above, is to sprint your horse out in straight lines more. If I have a horse that needs more speed, I am not going to practice him much on the pattern, and just try to free him up. Are you using spurs? I rarely recommend them on mares... but if you need them, it might get you some forward motion.

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:45 pm

Ms Katie Pars wrote:Hey Molly! Thanks for your time on these questions! :-D

I would like to know what are your top five most absolute things that you expect your horse to master (training wise) before you start seasoning them? Also with that, how do you teach a horse to keep running around a barrel and not a "stop & pivot" style turn?

I bought a Jet of Honor bred mare in October, and she is a real long strided mare, so would like to teach her to keep running around the barrels and use her stride to her full advantage.


P.S- I know you have a Jet of Honor bred horse, what are your thoughts on the Jet of Honor horses?


:-D Thanks again!! :-D


The five most absolute things....... that's a toughie, and here's why I say that. Many great horses could almost be classified as a 'freaks'. Meaning that if you tried to train their brothers and sisters in the exact same way, it may not turn out as good. What make a horse great is their desire to win, and of course that is very closely followed by their talent. With that said, I really like to have a horse broke. Broke to me means that a horse understands my cues, and what level of response I expect from those cues in the pattern. I have seen some horses so broke that they wouldn't think for themselves, and that was no good. They have to be confident to go out and do their job. Lately, in doing the clinics, we have to work a lot on basic handling to get the horses prepared to learn my exercises on the pattern. I think that when a horse learns balance, it is a great asset to his barrel turns. One more thing...... I have a Jet of Honor, and he has some troubles with handling ground... I.e. running around his turns. If I had to train one again, I think that I would keep the idea of 'collection' in the back of my mind.

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:50 pm

livetoride wrote:Hi Molly,

I was just wondering if you have had any barrel horses that have bled after you have made a run? This is a new thing for me and I am just looking for the best way to take care of it and wanting to hear other stories about this.

Thank you for your time! :Sun: and keep making the great videos!!! 8o)


This is a good question, because I am down in the 'heart' of bleeding country. For some reason, many horses bleed in Texas and the South. I have heard that it is due to the humidity. I am convinced that bleeding has something to do with over-exhertion (sp?). My horse Kat used to bleed every once in awhile, and now he doesn't. I have him on two things that I think make a big difference. One is the product called Stem Tech. It promotes the release of Stem Cells from your horse's own body to aid in healing and repair. For some reason, Kat has changed big time on this product. Secondly, I have him on Vitamin K powder which is supposed to help with the bleeding as well. If I were you, I think I would have to try the Stem Tech right away - I had tried Lasix and many other remedies and they didn't work.

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:54 pm

AG wrote:Hi Molly, thanks for taking the time to answer our questions!!

Are there any specific conformation qualities you look for or must have in your barrel horses or prospects?

Thanks,
Angela



This is a great question for me to ponder, because I can look in my own barn and see one big problem - feet!! Shadow has had poor feet - club - all his career. It has been such a challenge to keep him sound, and it has been so EXPENSIVE!! I would strongly urge you to get a horse with good size feet - it will be so much easier. If a horse had double 00 feet, I think that I would have to turn them down. I am getting more aware of necks on a barrel horse. I like a neck that isn't too short- or let's say, I know that the horse will probably have a tendency to be stiff in his turns if he has that short neck. A nice lower head set is also a nice perk - I really don't like high headed horses (and my horse Kat carries his head very high - go figure:)

weder
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby weder » Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:55 pm

Molly Powell wrote:
weder wrote:Thank you very much for taking the time to answer our questions Molly!!!

My horse is very powerful in his turns and tends to pop me out of the saddle. I am trying really hard to sit deep and lock my elbow, but he still seems to pop me out. Any suggestions or ideas that could help me ride smoother through his turns?

Thank you once again 8o)[/quot

Hello! I apologize that I am on a little late tonight - I just returned from the weekly jackpot down at the Lonestart Arena in Stephenville, TX (my hometown). In response to your question about your horse that pops you in the saddle, I have one main thought on this. Without seeing your horse, it's hard to say exactly what is going on, of course. The first thing that comes to my mind is front end soundness. Have you taken x-rays of his feet lately? It sounds kind of backwards, but a horse is an 'into pressure' animal, so if his front feet are hurting, he may want to get onto them more. Of course, I could be completely wrong, and its his hind end...... If only they could talk:) I would place him on some Pureform Glucosamine product right away, to cover my bases.


Here's a video, if that might help :-D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-qGF9-kpPo

Molly Powell
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Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2009 2:36 pm

Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:05 pm

wheels2 wrote:Hi Molly,

Thanks for taking your time with answering our questions. I have this 12 yr old gelding who has always had alley issues, it first started out by rearing and not wanting to go in but after i would get him in the alley he would go and make good runs. i just learned that he did best if i would hand walk him right into the alley and have someone hold him while i got on, that way we wouldnt hurt anyone or ourselves. lately he will sometimes go into the alley on his own but now he is starting to completely freeze up, he wont move his feet and wont go in to do a run. so to make a long story short we finally found out the source of his physical problems and he is now being looked after accordingly (massage, chiropractor, injections, ulcer treatments, ect...) so i guess my question is after we get these problems fixed what can a person do to rebuild his confidence with different exercises ect..? and what should i do if we are at a show and he freezes up on me again?
Also i have a mare that really swings her hip out around the barrels, even in slow work. i have tried collecting her and she tucks beautifully but wont drive that hip under and round her back like shes suppose too. so i would move my foot back and push it back in, sometimes she got really hot on me when i made her keep it in. what are some exercises i can do to keep that hip in without letting her know that i am doing so? and what can i do in a run to prevent that hip from getting strung out?

Thanks so much :)
Jess

Alley sour horses are so nerve-racking to ride and compete on! One thing that I have to bring up is to check and see if he's bleeding. The nerves can be caused by bleeding and the pain and stress that it causes. Does he breathe hard after a run? After some experience in this part of the arena (Kat has been a challenge to work with in the alley) I have determined that it is best to get a comfortable routine for the horse and go with that. I keep Kat back away from the arena, sometimes stay off him until just a runner or two before I go, and then have his stable mate walk him up the alley - while the rider leads Kat by the rein. And I would try different relaxants until I find something that works! Don't give up on that front - ever. My favorite relaxant is Pureform's Cool AS Ice- and it takes two doses 3-4 hrs prior to the race to achieve maximum performance for us. I prefer the herbal relaxants because they don't seem to take any run out of my horse. Kat was on Cool AS Ice (double dose) at the 2007 NFR each run.

As for your 'butt swinging' mare, I suggest trying to turn her back on the fence some, of course in a relaxed manner. Come to a full stop by the fence, and make sure to use your outside leg to keep her hind end from swinging in the turn. You can get a great result from this exercise at a walk and trot. Now would be the time for you to try your hand in the cutting pen to further your horsemanship experience which will enable you to properly handle your horse.

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:10 pm

rodeocatchpen wrote:Hi Molly,
I have a six year old that really locks onto the barrels but sometimes anticipates the turn too much and shuts down too quickly. It really shows up on his first barrel the most. You can feel him pushing on the inside rein about three strides in. I'm able to get him by most times but know we are losing time doing this. He's really quick and athletic but he's also the type of horse that if you do something too many times in a row ,in the practice pen, it will show up in your run. Been there done that. LOL Thanks for any suggestions you may have. :wink:



This is a common problem training horses, and of course getting them better broke, where you can handle them off of the inside rein really helps. Lately, I have been heeling a track steer on my colts to free them up around the corner. It's like holding a meeting out of the office so that when you return to the office, everyone is fresh and happy:) Did you read last month's Barrel Horse News? I elaborated on the roping practice in there.

One exercise that I do on the barrel pattern is to set a tire or two in the areas where I need some room. This will change the plan from holding my horse off the turn, to going AROUND the tires and barrel - which was what we were trying to achieve in the first place, right?

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:13 pm

jr wrote:Hi Molly Thanks for doing this.

I have a 12 year old gelding running bred on top - cutting/reining bred on the bottom. He has been a huge challenge to just get broke and a good handle on him, in order for me to gain control on him I basically took all the run out of him and put alot of collection in him and rode him like a reiner to gain control. We are now on the barrels, I have jackpotted him lightly. He has super beautiful turns but is only high loping betweeen. How do I now teach him to start running or do I just let him start to figure that out himself. What I mean is do they find their speed as they get confident or at some point should I be asking for it? The last jackpot in the fall he did have a bit more run but then he blew past all his barrels, which really caught me off guard. I am not sure if I should be asking for more speed or just letting him find it. If I should be asking for run or teaching him to run, what methods do you suggest. I know the run is there, he just doesn't know he can because I haven't let him for so long. If he does get more run between the barrels and then looses his nice turns do I let him try and figure that out for a few runs, or should I be slowing him down again to make sure he maintains his turns. Thanks Molly, hope I wasn't too confusing.


LOL! You didn't lose me:) Would you be able to rope on him? It would be a way to teach him to run and free up - but away from the barrel pattern. You could also sprint him out on a track or straight stretch of ground. He may just pick up some speed with more runs - that is common. And don't be suprised if you have to put a little more bit on as he becomes more aggressive.

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:15 pm

EJacknife wrote:Hi Molly! Thanks so much for answering all of our questions! Heres mine....I have an older mare...shes comming 8yrs in 2010. I started her on barrels in the fall of her 4th yr and rode her for about 6 months then she sat for 2 yrs, I got pregnant then she did! haha! I got back on her this fall and she didnt forget a thing I had shown her! 8o) BUT, she is pretty lazy, very willing but sluggish. She is a daughter of Bar O Sonny Burner ( Marlene Eddlemans old stud) and shes built so nice and is awesome to work with.....do you think she is going to be ok to run? Or is she too old and set in her ways? Did I leave her sit too long? :shock: My husband says, she just had a baby....do u like running after youve just had a baby?! He's got a point!? :-) Thanks so much, Blessing and Merry Christmas! :-D


LOL!! Well it's always fun to hear a guy's perspective...... but he has a point in the fact that you will need to get her in good shape so that she is strong. I think that if you like her, you should go on and train her. 10 and 11 are my favorite years to run a horse anyway.

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:17 pm

littled wrote:Hi Molly, I have a couple of questions for you.

First question is somewhat piggy backing on a post that was already made, but I have a 8 year old horse with lots of cow breeding who is shutting me down really bad on the second barrel - hes really ratey and indoors is the worst, wondering what you would do to encourage him to keep running, there's been a few times I thought I needed velcrow in my seat because he will almost stop, especially if it's a small pen.

Second question, I attended your clinic in August and have been doing lots of the exercises, anyways when we do the exercise where we go from a big circle to a small circle, my horse is having problems keeping his lead, he completes the small circle, but when he strides out to back into the bigger circle he keeps switching leads....not sure if it's me doing something wrong or him......

Thanks so much for being a special guest on here, it's great to pass our questions your way!

Merry Christmas!


It sounds like your horse could be a little closterphobic - try getting in to ride and practice everytime before you compete for awhile. You don't have to make all runs, but do the walk stops, trots and a lope or two. Pick up on your reins and shake a bat at him and let him know that you two need to win money tonight!!

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:21 pm

Give Me Dash wrote:Hi Molly!

Thanks for coming on and answering our questions! I have a gelding (will be 10 in the new year), who was running at the top of the 1D last winter (February, March) then he got hurt. He pulled his pelvic mucsle. In June my vet and chiropractor (Roger Lewis) both told me to give him a year off to heal. So my question is, when its time to start getting him back into running shape, what would you advise as an excerise program or schedule? I really feel that he will be a great horse, so I am in no hurry to push things, and hinder him being totally healed.

Thanks so much! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.


Well, I hope he gets to come back and kick butt! Each horse is differnt. I love the Aqua Tred to start out. And I guess just set your watch and start out at 5 minutes of trotting and galloping, or until he just breaks a sweat, and slowly work up from there. The key is not to over do it of course, but make sure to time his exercise and watch out to only ride him until he shows some warmth to his neck or heavier breathing. A horse in good shape should be able to trot and gallop for 10-12 min. consecutively. That's about 2 miles- which is plenty. A little walking is good too.

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:25 pm

reinhardt4 wrote:Going further with the cow breeding post. I also have a true blue cutting horse, turned team roping horse, and now I decided he should be a barrel racing horse as well. This horse is/has been always super easy to train to do anything. I was recently readin Sue Smith's article in the Spin to Win about how she likes her horses to take longer strides around the barrels vs super tight with really small strides and turns.
What are your thoughts? My horse is really ratey, but not to the point he would stall or cut in front of a barrel, but basically indoors I have to remember to ride as hard as I can and just sit, dont touch the reins! He tends to wrap the barrels all the way around, I could basically touch it all the way around..should I be changing anything? One thing someone told me is that I lose a bit of time off the backside of the barrel...I do find if I make sure to ride all the way around instead of just sitting at the barrel that helps...
I am a team roper myself and very new to all this barrel racing! But he seems to like it and I have been placing so now I need to learn how to do it properly! I will admit, I dont practice much, but when I do I just do big round circles around the barrels at a walk, trot, lope (all same speed all the way around), and then make one or maybe 2 runs...any other exercise ideas/tips for this kind of horse?

What kind of bit should I use in this horse? I just use a little billy allen type shanked snaffle, broke in the middle with a little port, with no tie down. I was thinking maybe even a straight snaffle?? He does seem to like the Rickey Green chain bit for Team roping, but Im not sure if they use those in barrel racing!

I could go on! haha, but I think thats enough!



I dont know if pictures help! But I added 1 just in case! It is of 2nd barrel.I hope all my friends dont laugh at me for my posting!

Thanks!


Nice pic! I am not sure what to say. Without seeing you run, It is hard to say. I like the fact that you are already doing well, and if it doesn't feel to bad to you, I think that I would not change too much. Have you watched my videos? They may give you some ideas. My best advice, and it sounds like we're on the same page from what you have already said, is not to make it too big of a deal - your horse obviously has talent, and it would be better to let him find his own way for awhile to let his competitive side mature.

Molly Powell
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Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2009 2:36 pm

Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:29 pm

weder wrote:
Molly Powell wrote:
weder wrote:Thank you very much for taking the time to answer our questions Molly!!!

My horse is very powerful in his turns and tends to pop me out of the saddle. I am trying really hard to sit deep and lock my elbow, but he still seems to pop me out. Any suggestions or ideas that could help me ride smoother through his turns?

Thank you once again 8o)[/quot

Hello! I apologize that I am on a little late tonight - I just returned from the weekly jackpot down at the Lonestart Arena in Stephenville, TX (my hometown). In response to your question about your horse that pops you in the saddle, I have one main thought on this. Without seeing your horse, it's hard to say exactly what is going on, of course. The first thing that comes to my mind is front end soundness. Have you taken x-rays of his feet lately? It sounds kind of backwards, but a horse is an 'into pressure' animal, so if his front feet are hurting, he may want to get onto them more. Of course, I could be completely wrong, and its his hind end...... If only they could talk:) I would place him on some Pureform Glucosamine product right away, to cover my bases.


Here's a video, if that might help :-D



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-qGF9-kpPo


Nice run! I am still not sure - it didn't look too bad to me - check the soundness. Good luck in your competitions!

Molly Powell
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Re: Special Guest - Molly Powell - ends Dec 22nd

Postby Molly Powell » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:32 pm

Well, I had better get some sleep! Tomorrow is a baking and wrapping day for me! You all stay warm up there! It was 70 here today:) Sorry - I had to tell myself that too - its supposed to turn cold here tomorrow too. Merry Christmas and thanks for having me on tonight! M.


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